top of page

Fan Group

Public·13 members

Seresta Paquito D Rivera Pdf 45




Seresta by Paquito D'Rivera: A Musical Analysis


Seresta by Paquito D'Rivera: A Musical Analysis




Seresta is a composition by Cuban-born jazz saxophonist and clarinetist Paquito D'Rivera, who is a Grammy-winning artist and a child prodigy. He started learning music with his father at the age of 5, who was a well-known classical saxophonist and conductor in Cuba. Seresta was composed by D'Rivera in collaboration with Howard Levy and Manfredo Fest, and it was recorded live by Dizzy Gillespie and the United Nations Orchestra in 1989. Seresta is a Brazilian word that means "serenade", and it is also a musical genre that originated in Rio de Janeiro in the 19th century. Seresta is characterized by romantic and sentimental melodies, often accompanied by guitar or mandolin.


Download File: https://urlcod.com/2w4e1Z


In this article, we will analyze the musical structure, harmony, melody, and rhythm of Seresta, as well as the transcription of D'Rivera's clarinet solo. We will use the sheet music available on Musescore and the YouTube video of the live performance as references.


Musical Structure




Seresta is a 32-bar song form that follows the AABA structure, where each section is 8 bars long. The song has a slow tempo of around 60 beats per minute, and it is in the key of C major. The song begins with a 4-bar introduction by the piano, followed by the main melody played by the clarinet. After the melody, there is a solo section where D'Rivera improvises over the chord changes of the song. The solo section is followed by a reprise of the melody, and then a coda where the clarinet and the piano play a descending chromatic line that ends on a C major chord.


Harmony




The harmony of Seresta is based on diatonic chords from the C major scale, as well as some secondary dominants and tritone substitutions. The chord progression of the A section is: Cmaj7 Am7 Dm7 G7 Cmaj7 Am7 Dm7 G7. The chord progression of the B section is: Em7 A7 Dm7 G7 Cmaj7 F#7b5 Fm6 E7b9. The F#7b5 and Fm6 chords are tritone substitutions for C7 and Bdim7, respectively. The E7b9 chord is a secondary dominant that leads to Am7, which is the first chord of the A section.


Melody




The melody of Seresta is composed of mostly stepwise motion, with some leaps and chromatic notes. The melody has a lyrical and expressive quality, and it uses syncopation and anticipation to create rhythmic interest. The melody also uses some motifs that are repeated or varied throughout the song. For example, the first four notes of the melody (C-D-E-F) are repeated in bars 5-6 and 13-14, but with different rhythms. The last four notes of the melody (G-A-B-C) are also repeated in bars 8 and 16, but with different harmonies.


Rhythm




The rhythm of Seresta is based on a samba groove, which is a Brazilian style of music that originated from African influences. Samba is characterized by a strong emphasis on the second beat of each measure, as well as syncopated patterns that create a sense of swing and groove. The rhythm section of Seresta consists of piano, bass, drums, and percussion. The piano plays chords on every beat, with some variations and embellishments. The bass plays mostly root notes on every beat, with some passing notes and chromatic approaches. The drums play a samba pattern that accents the second beat with a snare drum hit, and uses hi-hat, bass drum, and cymbals to create variations. The percussion plays different instruments such as tambourine, shaker, cowbell, and agogo bells to add more layers and colors to the rhythm.


Clarinet Solo




D'Rivera's clarinet solo is an example of his virtuosic technique and musical creativity. He uses various elements such as scales, arpeggios, patterns, motifs, chromaticism, embellishments, and dynamics to create a coherent and expressive solo. He also interacts with the rhythm section, responding to their cues and accents. His solo is divided into four choruses, each one corresponding to one cycle of the song form. We will analyze each chorus in detail below.


First Chorus




The first chorus begins with a pickup note (G) on the last eighth note of bar 4, leading to the first chord of the song (Cmaj7). D'Rivera plays a C major scale ascending from G to E, then descending from D to G, outlining the chord tones of Cmaj7 and Am7. He then plays a D minor pentatonic scale descending from A to D, followed by a chromatic approach from C# to D, outlining the chord tones of Dm7 and G7. He then repeats the same idea over the next four bars, but with some rhythmic variations. He ends the first A section with a long note (G) over the G7 chord, creating tension and anticipation for the next section.


The second A section begins with a pickup note (E) on the last eighth note of bar 12, leading to the first chord of the section (Em7). D'Rivera plays an E minor pentatonic scale ascending from E to B, then descending from A to E, outlining the chord tones of Em7 and A7. He then plays a D minor pentatonic scale descending from C to F, followed by a chromatic approach from E to F, outlining the chord tones of Dm7 and G7. He then repeats the same idea over the next four bars, but with some rhythmic variations. He ends the second A section with a long note (C) over the Cmaj7 chord, creating resolution and relaxation.


Second Chorus




The second chorus begins with a pickup note (E) on the last eighth note of bar 20, leading to the first chord of the song (Cmaj7). D'Rivera plays a C major scale ascending from E to G, then descending from F to C, outlining the chord tones of Cmaj7 and Am7. He then plays a D minor pentatonic scale descending from D to A, followed by a chromatic approach from G# to A, outlining the chord tones of Dm7 and G7. He then repeats the same idea over the next four bars, but with some rhythmic variations. He ends the first A section with a long note (A) over the G7 chord, creating tension and anticipation for the next section.


The B section begins with a pickup note (G) on the last eighth note of bar 28, leading to the first chord of the section (Em7). D'Rivera plays an E minor pentatonic scale ascending from G to D, then descending from C to G, outlining the chord tones of Em7 and A7. He then plays a D minor pentatonic scale descending from F to C, followed by a chromatic approach from Bb to C, outlining the chord tones of Dm7 and G7. He then plays a C major scale ascending from C to E, then descending from D to Bb, outlining the chord tones of Cmaj7 and F#7b5. He then plays an F minor pentatonic scale ascending from Ab to Eb, then descending from Db to Ab, outlining the chord tones of Fm6 and E7b9. He ends the B section with a long note (A) over the E7b9 chord, creating tension and anticipation for the next section.


The second A section begins with a pickup note (C) on the last eighth note of bar 36, leading to the first chord of the section (Am7). D'Rivera plays an A minor pentatonic scale ascending from C to E, then descending from D to A, outlining the chord tones of Am7 and Dm7. He then plays a G major scale ascending from B to D, then descending from C to G, outlining the chord tones of G7 and Cmaj7. He then repeats the same idea over the next four bars, but with some rhythmic variations. He ends the second A section with a long note (G) over the G7 chord, creating tension and anticipation for the next chorus.


Third Chorus




The third chorus begins with a pickup note (D) on the last eighth note of bar 44, leading to the first chord of the song (Cmaj7). D'Rivera plays a motif based on a C major triad ascending from D to G, then descending from E to C, outlining the chord tones of Cmaj7 and Am7. He then plays a variation of the same motif over the next two bars, using chromatic notes and syncopation. He then plays another variation of the motif over the next four bars, using different rhythms and octaves. He ends the first A section with a long note (G) over the G7 chord, creating tension and anticipation for the next section. The B section begins with a pickup note (E) on the last eighth note of bar 52, leading to the first chord of the section (Em7). D'Rivera plays a motif based on an E minor triad ascending from E to B, then descending from G to E, outlining the chord tones of Em7 and A7. He then plays a variation of the same motif over the next two bars, using chromatic notes and syncopation. He then plays another variation of the motif over the next four bars, using different rhythms and octaves. He ends the B section with a long note (A) over the E7b9 chord, creating tension and anticipation for the next section. The second A section begins with a pickup note (C) on the last eighth note of bar 60, leading to the first chord of the section (Am7). D'Rivera plays a motif based on an A minor triad ascending from C to E, then descending from D to A, outlining the chord tones of Am7 and Dm7. He then plays a variation of the same motif over the next two bars, using chromatic notes and syncopation. He then plays another variation of the motif over the next four bars, using different rhythms and octaves. He ends the second A section with a long note (G) over the G7 chord, creating tension and anticipation for the next chorus. Fourth Chorus




The fourth chorus begins with a pickup note (E) on the last eighth note of bar 68, leading to the first chord of the song (Cmaj7). D'Rivera plays a motif based on a C major arpeggio ascending from E to G, then descending from E to C, outlining the chord tones of Cmaj7. He then plays a variation of the same motif over the next bar, using chromatic notes and syncopation. He then plays another variation of the motif over the next two bars, using different rhythms a


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...
Group Page: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page